Position Papers are due on February 5th to be considered for the Best Position Paper Award, and February 12th to be considered for any committee award. Submit them to DISEC@bmun.org. 

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UN Disarmament and International Security Committee (DISEC)

Head Chair | Stevie Zheng

Vice-Chairs | Elle Mahdavi, Liam Campbell, Richard Jin, Michelle McLean


BLOC A
DOUBLE DELEGATION


Topic 1 | Proliferation of Nuclear, Chemical, and Biological Weapons

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With the United States’ development of the atomic bomb during World War II, the world was thrust into a new era: one where unimaginable horrors now ruled the geopolitical climate. The international community has since learned from its predecessors and taken steps to restrict and regulate weapons of mass destruction. However, with few states still having enormous nuclear arsenals, as well as the aggressive advances of non-compliant states and the ever-present threat of rogue actors, the discussion around nuclear weapons is still scarily relevant today. Just recently, the first nuclear weapons prohibition treaty was signed, yet without the support of any nuclear-weapon states or NATO members. Additionally, there has been an uptick in chemical attacks in recent years, specifically surrounding Syria, with both the Assad regime and the United States Armed Forces being accused of using such armaments. These and other current events will provide a complex array of challenges for our committee to tackle.

Topic 2 | Small Arms and Light Weapons

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Long gone are the days that a soldier had to wait till they were 500 yards away from their target before hitting them. Now someone in Nevada can press a button and send a drone halfway across the world to hit their target without ever having to leave the facility. Just as the advancement of technology has changed the way war is fought, the emergence of new actors, such as private military and security companies functioning in place of traditional armed forces, has altered war’s landscape. DISEC will examine how the international community should address the emerging changed norms and regulations that have arisen since the modernization and privatization of war.